Hot Off the Press

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PLIDA continues to create member benefits that help each of you attain the highest level of expertise in your clinical practice. As members of the PLIDA education committee, all of us have experienced what it is like to try to keep up with the latest literature in the perinatal bereavement field. With that in mind, we bring you notification of new publications that are “Hot Off the Press.”

Given that there is so much to do to keep up with the latest research and clinically-based practice articles, we have developed a process for making that easier. There are two ways to know what is hot off the press: You can send information on the article to this email: hotoffthepress@plida.org. In addition, education committee members will do the same thing, watching listserves and journals for articles of interest to our interdisciplinary membership. We do not have a particular time frame within which to get the information to our members. Instead, we want to let you know through our social media outlets – Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn – when something of interest comes across our desk.

Thank you for supporting PLIDA through your membership and other ways of helping the organization. 

Perinatal Bereavement and Palliative Care Offered Throughout the Healthcare System

This article provides a reference for a systemwide bereavement program and accompanying palliative care services. Charlotte Wool, Anita Catlin Abstract: The aims of this article are twofold: (I) provide a general overview of perinatal bereavement services throughout the healthcare system and (II) identify future opportunities to improve bereavement services, including providing resources for the creation of standardized care guidelines, policies and educational opportunities across the healthcare system. Commentary is provided related to maternal child services, the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), prenatal clinics, operating room (OR) and perioperative services, emergency department (ED), ethics, chaplaincy and palliative care services. An integrated system of care increases quality and safety and contributes to patient satisfaction. Physicians, nurses and administrators must encourage pregnancy loss support so that regardless of where in the facility the contact is made, when in the pregnancy the loss occurs, or whatever the conditions contributing to the pregnancy ending, trained caregivers are there to provide bereavement support for the family and palliative symptom management to the fetus born with a life limiting condition. The goal for respectful caregiving throughout an entire hospital system is achievable and critically important. Keywords: Palliative care; perinatal palliative care (PPC); antenatal palliative care; hospital system. View this article at: http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/apm.2018.11.03

January/February 2019 The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing - Special Topics Issue on Perinatal Bereavement

The following are the articles and editorial written specifically for this journal edition (publication information, including abstract, available on pubmed.gov): * Special Topics Series: Perinatal Bereavement Care (with guest editorial by Limbo & Hutti) * Complications and Assumptions after Perinatal Death (Cacciatore & Thieleman) * Support for Young Black Urban Women after Perinatal Loss (Fenstermacher & Hupcey * Theory to Inform and Guide Perinatal Bereavement Care (Hutti & Limbo) Nursing Care of Women Experiencing Stillbirth (Nurse-Clarke, DiCicco-Bloom, & Limbo)

Support for Young Black Urban Women After Perinatal Loss

The following article has been published ahead of print (PAP) by MCN The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing. This is part of a special topics edition of the journal on perinatal bereavement, with Rana Limbo and Marianne Hutti, guest editors, which will have a January/February,2019, publication date. You have the opportunity to read these excellent articles now, rather than waiting for the "in print" version of the journal. Fenstermacher, Kimberly H.; Hupcey, Judith E. MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. November 15, 2018 Purpose: To describe the bereavement support needs of black urban women in late adolescence after perinatal loss. Study Design and Methods: Eight black women aged 18 to 21 years who had experienced recent perinatal loss were interviewed in person or by telephone at three points in the 12 weeks that followed their loss to describe their perinatal bereavement experience and support needs. Data from the interviews were analyzed using constant comparative analysis. Results: Black adolescent women need culturally appropriate bereavement support targeted at key transition points along the bereavement trajectory. They need accurate information, compassionate and respectful communication, and support from their mothers, grandmothers, and other women from their community of faith who have experienced perinatal loss. They value mementos, such as photographs and footprints. Clinical Implications: Nurses are well-positioned to be consistent caregivers and to provide clear, compassionate communication and anticipatory guidance to young black women experiencing perinatal loss. Attending to spiritual needs, harnessing family support, providing mementos, and encouraging reflection through journaling may help adolescent women find meaning and new perspectives on their bereavement experience. The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Normal Complications and Abnormal Assumptions After Perinatal Death

Cacciatore, Joanne, PhD; Thieleman, Kara, MSW MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing: November 15, 2018 - Volume Publish Ahead of Print - Issue - p doi: 10.1097/NMC.0000000000000486 There are several ways, clinically, to approach grief after perinatal death, including from a humanistic or a medicalized perspective. The death of a baby is complicated. The loss is an embodied one that incites deep psychological wounds and can be isolating for many parents. Parents process their grief experiences within a sometimes oppressive social context that either sees their expressions of loss as a normal response to an abnormal tragedy or as pathology. Several diagnostic categories have been proposed relative to the traumatic grief experiences of grieving parents that potentially affect them. We explore this nomenclature and, through the lens of a Social-Cognitive Processing Model, examine social support, attitudes, context, and oppressive interpersonal and social structures that affect parents. Clinical implications are discussed.

Relationship Between Mindfulness and Posttraumatic Stress in Women Who Experienced Stillbirth

Huberty J, Green J, Cacciatore J, Buman MP, Leiferman J. OBJECTIVE: To explore the potential factors that mediate the relationship between mindfulness and symptoms of posttraumatic stress (PTS) in women who experienced stillbirth. DESIGN: A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data before women's participation in an online mindfulness intervention (i.e., online yoga). SETTING: This was a national study, and women participated in their own homes. PARTICIPANTS: Women who experienced stillbirth (N = 74) within the past 2 years and resided in the United States. METHODS: Women were recruited nationally, primarily through social media. Participants (N = 74) completed baseline assessments (self-report mental and physical health surveys) via a Web-based survey tool. We conducted an exploratory factor analysis of the COPE Inventory subscales to reduce the number of variables before entry into a mediation model. We then tested the mediation effects of sleep quality, self-esteem, resilience, and maladaptive coping on the relationship between mindfulness and PTS symptoms. RESULTS: Through the exploratory factor analysis we identified a two-factor solution. The first factor included nine subscales that represented adaptive coping strategies, and the second factor included five subscales that represented maladaptive coping strategies. Results from multiple mediation analysis suggested that mindfulness had a significant inverse relationship to PTS symptoms mediated by sleep quality. CONCLUSION: Mindfulness practices may have potential benefits for grieving women after stillbirth. Evidence-based approaches to improve sleep quality also may be important to reduce PTS symptoms in women after stillbirth. Copyright © 2018 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30292774

I Would Do It All Over Again": Cherishing Time and the Absence of Regret in Continuing a Pregnancy after a Life-Limiting Diagnosis.

Wool Charlotte; Limbo Rana; and Denny-Koelsch Erin M. Journal of Clinical Ethics. 2018 Fall;29(3):227-236. In addition, Tammy Ruiz Ziegler provided a brief response to the article after I sent it to her. Having someone with extensive knowledge of PPC respond to the article's usefulness may be worthwhile to include as you spread the news of the publication. Tammy is known for her PPC video that has been translated into numerous languages and is widely used in PPC education programs. Comment from Tammy Ruiz Ziegler, RN, CPLC: "Wow...thank you VERY much for sharing. We have needed this study for a long time and I SO appreciate you sharing it with me."
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30226824

Relationship Between Mindfulness and Posttraumatic Stress in Women Who Experienced Stillbirth.

Huberty J, Green J, Cacciatore J, Buman MP, Leiferman J. Abstract OBJECTIVE: To explore the potential factors that mediate the relationship between mindfulness and symptoms of posttraumatic stress (PTS) in women who experienced stillbirth. DESIGN: A cross-sectional analysis of baseline data before women's participation in an online mindfulness intervention (i.e., online yoga). SETTING: This was a national study, and women participated in their own homes. PARTICIPANTS: Women who experienced stillbirth (N = 74) within the past 2 years and resided in the United States. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30292774

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